Hearing Aids

Hearing Aid Overview

A hearing aid helps amplify environmental sound to give you a better picture of the world around you. By taking an evaluation of your hearing ability, we can find out exactly which frequencies are quieter for you, and provide targeted amplification at those frequencies. That means your brain will get something more like a normal presentation of the sound it is used to hearing, and the world will seem more like it does when hearing ability is “normal.”
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Hearing aids have come a long way in recent decades.

In addition to amplifying sound at specific frequencies, DSP (digital signal processing) now allows hearing aids to process sound in a variety of ways. Individual manufacturers take advantage of DSP differently, but it has become very common for hearing aids to perform complex functions like reducing background noise, compressing speech, and assisting with spatial location by utilizing up to four microphones and networking the left and right hearing aids.

Hearing aids have come a long way in recent decades. In addition to amplifying sound at specific frequencies, DSP (digital signal processing) now allows hearing aids to process sound in a variety of ways. Individual manufacturers take advantage of DSP differently, but it has become very common for hearing aids to perform complex functions like reducing background noise, compressing speech, and assisting with spatial location by utilizing up to four microphones and networking the left and right hearing aids.

More and more commonly, hearing aids will automatically detect the type of environment you are in and switch their programming automatically to suit it. Some manufacturers are even branching out to utilize multiple computer chips to process speech and background sound entirely separately.

All of this translates to a much clearer audio image than was ever possible with hearing aids before. Depending on your specific needs and hearing issues, Ashland Audiology can “tune” your hearing aid to help you focus on what you need to hear most. We work with you over time to make sure you’re getting the right amounts of amplification, in the right places, at the right times. While this can sometimes take a while to get right, ongoing fitment is a normal part of the process. It takes a while to adjust to new hearing aids, and we’re here to help make sure you adjust successfully and get the amplification you need to live the life you want!

Hearing Aids

Types of Hearing Aids



Behind-the-Ear (BTE)

One of the most common form factors, BTE hearing aids house all their electronics in a small body that sits behind your ear. A thin plastic tube transports the sound into the earpiece. Your voice will sound more normal, and eating and drinking will not be as noisy as with other types. Because their body size is less limited than other types, they have the potential to house a lot of processing power and battery life.


Receiver-in-Canal (RIC)

Very popular for new wearers, the RIC looks similar to a BTE but with a crucial difference. Rather than sending the sound down a tube, the tube is switched out for a wire and the speaker (receiver) is actually in the earpiece. This means the sound travels a shorter distance, so battery life can be increased.



In-the-Ear (ITE)

Custom-molded to the ear canal and outer ear, all their electronics, microphones and speakers are housed in the same shell. They’re good for those with dexterity issues, and their wider body means they can accommodate many of the features that you might find in RIC and BTE aids.


In-the-Canal (ITC)

A little smaller than ITE designs, they fit all the way into the bowl of the outer ear. Like the designs above, they can incorporate directional microphones to help with difficult noise situations.



Completely-in-Canal (CIC)

More concealed than other types, only a little bit of the hearing aid is visible. They’re appropriate for those with a very active lifestyle, as they can fit easily under headbands and helmets. Because the microphones are inside your ear canals, you’ll have very few issues with wind interference.

Contact Ashland Audiology today to start the process of getting your new hearing aids!

Ashland


2101 Beaser Ave
Suite 3
Ashland, WI 54806

Phone: (715) 682-9311
Fax: (715) 682-9313

Office Hours:

Monday - Thursday: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Friday, 8:00 am - 4:00 pm

Walk-in Clinic Hours:

Monday & Friday: 9:00 - 10:00 am
Tuesday: 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Wednesday: 11:00 am - Noon
Thursday: 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

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Hayward


Hayward Area Memorial Hospital - Specialty Clinic
11040 N. State Road 77
Hayward, WI 54843

Located in the Medical Outreach Clinic in the Heritage Building

Phone: (715) 682-9311
Fax: (715) 682-9313

OFFICE HOURS:

Every Tuesday 9:00 am - 3:30 pm 

WALK-IN CLINIC HOURS:

Call our Ashland Office to schedule an appointment to have your hearing aids cleaned.

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Ironwood


Aspirus Ironwood Clinic
N10565 Grand View Lane
Ironwood, MI 49938-9622

Located on the 2nd floor of the Aspirus Ironwood Clinic

Phone: (715) 682-9311
Fax: (715) 682-9313

OFFICE HOURS:

Every other Wednesday 9:00 am- 3:30 pm

WALK-IN CLINIC HOURS:

Call our Ashland Office to schedule an appointment to have your hearing aids cleaned.

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